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GENEALOGICAL INFORMATION

GED FILES THAT MAY ASSIST OTHER FAMILY HISTORIANS


  • Extended family connections: This personal family research was originally undertaken for the names Webb, from the Downton area in Wiltshire, Turner from near by Wilton plus Holmes & Coulson from County Durham but in the course of this work the family trees of several cousins were also constructed. The relationships between all of these families are shown below along with access to their ged files. This data, along with associated genealogical notes, will be updated as additional information becomes available.

    family

    The files in .ged format are available for each of the families and can be obtained via a right click on the required name below then selecting Save Target As and choosing your genealogical software folder as the target. Alternatively, use a gedcom reader such as GENviewer which can be downloaded from the internet. Individuals requiring drop-down family tree diagrams or who have additional information to impart about these families can contact me, see bottom of page; when doing so please include GEN in the subject space.

  • GRO references Additional information can be obtained from the bmd certificates associated with the ged files given above. To obtain a list of these references click here. To return to this page click on the "back" arrow.

  • Kith, kin and cousins. Just how people are connected to remote members on a family tree is not always obvious but relationships can be determined via the following chart. An example of its use is given below.

     

    Find the relationship of a person to a common ancestor along the top row and another persons relationship to the same common ancestor down the left hand column. The relationship between these two people is where the row and column meet in the highlighted diagonal.

     

    CA = common ancestor C = child G = grand, e.g. GC = grand-child.

    S = sibling (brother or sister) N = niece or nephew

    #C =cousin, e.g. 1C = 1st cousin.

    #R = number of times removed, e.g. 1R = once removed.

     

    CA

    C

    GC

    GGC

    2 GGC

    3 GGC

    4 GGC

    5 GGC

    6 GGC

    C

    S

    N

    GN

    GGN

    2 GGN

    3 GGN

    4 GGN

    5 GGN

    GC

    N

    1 C

    1C-1R

    1C-2R

    1C-3R

    1C-4R

    1C-5R

    1C-6R

    GGC

    GN

    1C-1R

    2C

    2C-1R

    2C-2R

    2C-3R

    2C-4R

    2C-5R

    2 GGC

    GGN

    1C-2R

    2C-1R

    3C

    3C-1R

    3C-2R

    3C-3R

    3C-4R

    3 GGC

    2 GGN

    1C-3R

    2C-2R

    3C-1R

    4C

    4C-1R

    4C-2R

    4C-3R

    4 GGC

    3 GGN

    1C-4R

    2C-3R

    3C-2R

    4C-1R

    5C

    5C-1R

    5C-2R

    5 GGC

    4 GGC

    1C-5R

    2C-4R

    3C-3R

    4C-2R

    5C-1R

    6C

    6C-1R

    6 GGC

    5 GGC

    1C-6R

    2C-5R

    3C-4R

    4C-3R

    5C-2R

    6C-1R

    7C

     

    Example: GG children of a common ancestor from related families are 2nd cousins.

     

    Further, the number of a child’s direct ancestors (A) is: A = 2G+1– 2 where G represents the number of generations involved. So just going back to great-grand-parents, (3 generations), involves 14 people i.e. (usually) 7 different families all of which were probably responsible for adding cousins.

  • Collected history. During my search for ancestors much personal family information was also found which is not included in the ged files. The family traces revealed a tale of two regions stretching back to the end of the civil wars. While one family in the north east of England was creating a farming dynasty, in the south west ancestral farm workers were being thrust by the industrial revolution into new trades or the civil and defence establishments. It is also a tale of suicide and the gambling away of inherited assets by the better off and of a family walking, on several occasions, over 50 miles to claim parish relief. This family history, along with notes justifying the results given, will be made available to those with genuine family connections. To contact me, see below, and when doing so please include GEN in the subject space. The research results extend over several hundred years. This may seem a very long time span but it depends how you look at it. Although it is usual in genealogy to talk in terms of generations, an understanding of a span of time can more easily be understood when expressed in terms of a lifetime which, on average, is about 80 years. Anyone past middle age understands that a family trace of 300 years, i.e. 4 lifetimes is not very long.

  • Information sources used. Records held at the Public Records Office, Family Records Centre, County Record Offices, the LDS databases, professional researchers, various commercial publications and helpful individuals were all used to obtain the information. Any doubtful cases were independently investigated. There are many Internet sites providing potentially useful information but the majority of my data was obtained by trawling through census returns, bmd registrations and parish records; some of these are now available, or becoming available, on CD or the Internet. The current, (2009), web links / addresses found to be the most useful as major sources of information were:

    Birth, marriage & death registration certificates:
    The National Archives, (certificate ordering site)
      Kew, TW9 4DU. Tel. +44(0)2088763444. To visit take a District Line train to Kew.

    The National Archives references for census returns currently available are:

    1841 taken on June 6:     HO107
    1851 taken on March 30: HO107
    1861 taken on April 7:    RG9
    1871 taken on April 2:    RG10
    1881 taken on April 3:    RG11
    1891 taken on April 5:    RG12
    1901 taken on March 31: RG13
    1911 taken on April 2:    RG14

    Note: An individual internet site may not have the full range of census returns or BMDs.

    Birth, marriage & death records.(free):
    Free BMD

    Census returns.(free but not complete):
    Free CEN

    Birth, marriage, death & census records, (chargeable):
    Find My Past
    and The Ancestry site

    Commonwealth military war casualties:
    War Graves Commission

    LDS family database plus the UK 1881 census:
    Family Search

    Indexes for family research in Wiltshire:
    Nimrod Indexes

    Wiltshire Family History Society - Unit 3,bath Rd. Business Centre, Devizes, SN10 1HJ.

    Wiltshire & Swindon Records Office - Cocklebury Rd. Chippenham, SN15 3QN. Tel. 01249705500

    Durham County Records (chargeable) - County Hall, Durham - Tel: (+44)(0)1913833253

    Northumberland & Durham Family History Society

    The following web sites provided information of a more general nature:
    Genealogy for the UK and Ireland:   GENUKI

    Of an international nature:   Cyndi's list of links


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